September22014
joerojasburke:

But seriously, how quickly could a giant sauropod dinosaur react to an attack on a body part 150 feet from its brain? The excellent blog SV-POW! has the answer:

… sauropods really did have individual sensory nerve cells that ran from their extremities (tip of tail, soles of feet)–and from the rest of their skin–to their brainstems. In the longest sauropods, these cells were probably something like 150 feet long, and may have been the longest cells in the history of life. We haven’t found any fossils of these nerves and almost certainly never will, but we can be sure that sauropods had them because all vertebrates do, from hagfish on up. That’s just how we’re built. So how long does it take to send a nerve impulse 150 feet? The fastest nerve conduction velocities are in the neighborhood of 120 meters per second, so a signal from the very tip of the tail in a 150-foot sauropod would take about half a second to reach the brain…[continue reading]

Cartoon by Ed McLachlan, Punch magazine, 1981

joerojasburke:

But seriously, how quickly could a giant sauropod dinosaur react to an attack on a body part 150 feet from its brain? The excellent blog SV-POW! has the answer:

… sauropods really did have individual sensory nerve cells that ran from their extremities (tip of tail, soles of feet)–and from the rest of their skin–to their brainstems. In the longest sauropods, these cells were probably something like 150 feet long, and may have been the longest cells in the history of life. We haven’t found any fossils of these nerves and almost certainly never will, but we can be sure that sauropods had them because all vertebrates do, from hagfish on up. That’s just how we’re built. So how long does it take to send a nerve impulse 150 feet? The fastest nerve conduction velocities are in the neighborhood of 120 meters per second, so a signal from the very tip of the tail in a 150-foot sauropod would take about half a second to reach the brain…[continue reading]

Cartoon by Ed McLachlan, Punch magazine, 1981

(via scientificillustration)

12PM
who-wore-it-better:

Andy Warhol Oxidization Painting :: Etienne Chambaud Nameless

who-wore-it-better:

Andy Warhol Oxidization Painting :: Etienne Chambaud Nameless

12PM

spinachbabe:

buying clothes that aren’t black is hard

(Source: ppppbbt, via healingstone)

August212014
atelierentomologica:

Elaine Haxton (1909-1999) Moon, Moths and Moonflowers, 1976. Hand-coloured etching with aquatint

atelierentomologica:

Elaine Haxton (1909-1999) Moon, Moths and Moonflowers, 1976. Hand-coloured etching with aquatint

(Source: joseflebovicgallery.com)

9PM

magictransistor:

Lepidoptera (Moths & Butterflies).

9PM
wevortex:

By Tony Meeuwissen

wevortex:

By Tony Meeuwissen

8PM
dennys:

AFTER A LONG DAY OF PANKOUR, REFRESH YOURSELF WITH A HOT BOTTLE OF MAPLE SYRUP! #PANKOUR

dennys:

AFTER A LONG DAY OF PANKOUR, REFRESH YOURSELF WITH A HOT BOTTLE OF MAPLE SYRUP! #PANKOUR

April222014
tinderlines:

🚹 Guy Submission

tinderlines:

🚹 Guy Submission

February182014

laughterkey:

flamelikeme:

anieastonbaker:

ATTN: I WANT THIS TO BE MY LIFE

HOLY FUCKIN’ SHIT YEAH DIIIIIIDDO

(Source: anianioxenfree, via gtpomella)

February22014
patternbase:

'Stella - Fire'
A remake of a textiles screen printing project, Stella explores magnolia buds and morton bay fig trees as a patterning of Paddington in Sydney. 
Luella & Toots textiles design
// on spoonflower

patternbase:

'Stella - Fire'

A remake of a textiles screen printing project, Stella explores magnolia buds and morton bay fig trees as a patterning of Paddington in Sydney. 

Luella & Toots textiles design

// on spoonflower

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